There is an ideal solution for people who would like to visit Florence and learn about its art treasures, but only have a couple of days time: art history expert Waldemar H. de Boer (PhD.) offers short courses in the beautiful Palazzo Guadagni at Piazza Santo Spirito.

No primary knowledge of art history is necessary to participate. Both courses include site visits to some of the most important monuments in Florence and Tuscany.

Course fees
Renaissance Art in Florence:
1350 Euro for groups up to 4 people (337,50 Euro per person)
250 Euro per person extra for groups of more than 4 people
Medici Villas and Gardens:
1350 Euro for groups up to 4 people (337,50 Euro per person)
250 Euro per person extra for groups of more than 4 people
Prices incl. entrance fees, transport, coffee and lunch

For booking requests, please contact info@arthistoryflorence.com


Renaissance Art in Florence
(2 days / 9.00-14.30)

The Renaissance in Florence is one of the most intriguing cultural manifestations in Western History, in which religion, philosophy, economy, humanism and politics played an important part in the development of painting, sculpting and architecture. This course offers an introduction to the changes and progressions in art in this period. Key artists, such as Filippo Brunelleschi, Masaccio, Donatello, Leonardo da Vinci and Michelangelo, will be discussed. Next to that, attention will be paid to art patrons, like Cosimo and Lorenzo De’ Medici, and the artists’ daily life in this magnificent era.

Medici Villas and Gardens
(2 days / 10.30-16.00 hours)
In the 15th century, a revival of ancient Roman villa culture took place in Tuscany. Renaissance country estates started to cover the campagna, to escape from the hectic city life, to unwind, to go hunting, to organize social events or even to discuss philosophy, art and science. This course is concentrated on the intriguing villa life of the Medici family. Their villas were not only a statement of wealth and power. With the help of paintings, sculptures and complex garden architecture, they were also used to convey specific messages to their guests.

 

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